Forgiveness as a spiritual exercise; day 29 of Ramadan

https://cdn.psychologytoday.com/sites/default/files/blogs/72664/2012/09/106557-104163.jpg

To err is human; to forgive, divine.” – Alexander Pope
And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors.” – Matthew 6:12

Truth to be told, I am able to forgive others easier for big offenses than small / petty offenses. Today was no exception, and while I won’t get into it, when the offense was committed I was pissed off…and for several hours afterwards I spent time ruminating on what was done and I was nowhere in a better state of mind.

The quote,“In fact, not forgiving is like drinking rat poison and then waiting for the rat to die” (Anne Lamott) came to mind when I was in the throes of self misery. It didn’t set me free, but it did aid in the slow and arduous task of pushing the toxic lack of forgiveness out of my system. It was no easy feat, but after some time spent in prayer and also napping I was able to free myself and forgive the other, but also the ability to forgive myself.

I am human (surprising insight, eh?) and subsequently I act in human ways and sometimes the worse part of me comes to light; I hold grudges, I don’t forgive, I cut people down verbally and sometimes I passively cut them down in my head…among other things. But despite being all things at sometime or another, I remember that I am human, and that it is part of the human experience to screw up time and time again. And yet as we struggle through our humanity, we are at times compelled to do more and do better next time around; sure, some of us are quick to toss in the towel to make changes in our lives, but theoretically we might be in a better place for having done so instead of simply letting the chips fall where they may.

Within the forgiveness of others we are able to find some forgiveness for ourselves for what was done and how for a brief eon in time we forgot our humanity and divinity in others inasmuch we forgot the humanity and divinity within us. I think that’s why it’s good to forgive others inasmuch as well as ourselves, because if we don’t do the latter there’s a possible possibility that we hold onto something that is better off letting go.
So free others, forgive, free yourself, forgive!

So with all that being said, forgiveness was my keyword on the 29th day of Ramadan. Thanks be to God, The Great Forgiver, who forgives us. May we learn to forgive others and forgive ourselves when the occasion call for it, and may we learn from what we’ve done to make better choices to, if at all possible, not commit those offenses again.

Salaam alaikum be yours now and always,
Nathanael

Recognizing the humanity and divinity in everyone as a spiritual exercise; day 28 of Ramadan

https://i2.wp.com/www.zengardner.com/wp-content/uploads/Creation-700x466.jpg

God made everyone, she really did! And I am led to believe that we can cull some of our conflict and criticism for others, our hatred aimed at others, our disputes with others might be able to be patched up and leave us in a place of healing and not hurting if we keep this in mind; we are all made in the image of God.

I learned about this truth growing up by way of its Latin term, Imago Dei, and it has helped me out in not only knowing this truth but living it out. Because when you’re able to recognize the divinity in another person, you might just get a better view of their humanity as well.
It seems like some of the harshest conflicts and genocides across history have a common thread of removing humanity (and subsequently divinity) from the equation. If we reduce people to less than human, call them cockroaches (as the Tutsis were called prior to the Rwandan Genocide) or something else, we dehumanize them. And unfortunately people will be more malleable to do some of the worst things known to man against their fellow man because their humanity has been removed from them. And to a certain extent the humanity and thus divinity is removed from the oppressors as well.

So how do we keep our humanity as well as others intact and in check? Perhaps just realizing consciously and subconsciously that we ALL are made in the image of God, we ALL bear her likeness, we ALL have a right to life, we ALL have it hard but we can make life better for ALL if we put this into action.
I get that this might seem like hippie drippy bullshit, but I think it is a worthwhile endeavor, a good thing as well as a God thing, to get to a place individually / culturally / across the globe where we see the good in others inasmuch the God in others. It might take time for some of us, but we’re counting on ALL of humanity, not just some or for those it comes easier to.
So when should we ALL start seeing the good and God in others? The humanity and the divinity? Right here and now!

So with all that being said, humanity and divinity were my keywords on the 28th day of Ramadan. Thanks be to God for placing within everyone humanity and divinity. May we open up our eyes and lives in seeing it in others and extending it to others, for this truly awakens the humanity and divinity in us as well.

Salaam alaikum be yours now and always,
Nathanael

I am participating in Christians 4 Ramadan / #Christians4Ramadan to the best of my ability

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CHwUdXoWsAAogCo.jpg

Earlier this year I found out about a movement among some Muslims called #Muslims4Lent; essentially out of solidarity and interfaith appreciation there were those who partook in Lent despite it not being part of their faith tradition. When I found out about this I was deeply moved and resolved to partake in Ramadan when it came.

And it has started, as of sunset June 17th, and will continue through until July 17th. My reasons for partaking in Ramadan are similar to that of those who participated in Muslims 4 Lent, solidarity & interfaith appreciation, but I am also partaking to allot more time to prayer and other practices within my own faith tradition.
I admit, I haven’t fasted before for more than a week, and so I am not sure how my body will handle it given that I won’t be eating (with the exception of at night fall and before dawn.) for a month. As a result I am going to be diligent in participating to the fullest extent, but if health issues occur during my time of fasting I am going to postpone it and pick it up when I can provided I can (which is acceptable when it comes to fasting during the month of Ramadan).

Ramadan Mubarak y’all!
~Nathanael~